Olive Oil Production

 

 

 

  • Production in Greece occurs on a small scale, with most olive groves being found in semi-mountainous and mountainous regions.

  • Usually between 200-300 olive trees can grow per hectare. 

  • Pruning, fertilising and watering are administered at various intervals prior to the time of the harvest

  • Care must be taken in the way the olives are picked stored and transported to the pressing plant

  • Hand picking the olives is the best way to ensure the optimum outcome of the benefits of the olive

  • The olives must be picked before they ripen and start to fall of the trees

  • The olives should never touch the ground (usually a net is placed below the tree to avoid this), must ideally be stored in open crates, in the shade and delivered directly to factory for pressing on the same day.

  • FACT – small bodied varieties of olives make the best olive oil

  • At the pressing plant the olives are placed on a conveyor belt and are cleaned with water and their leaves separated

  • The olives are crushed into a paste and then gently mixed, before being passed into a centrifuge with lukewarm water (around 28°C) known as a decanter where the Oil and water are separated

  • The Olive oil is then pumped through a filter and into a holding tank where it is stored before the bottling process takes place (unfiltered olive oil DEGRADES in the bottle

  • With the tank stored in a cool dry place, the olive oil’s enemy during storage is only air. An expensive techniques (applied only by a handful of producers in the world) is to apply nitrogen in the tank to stop the oil from oxidising, keeping it in perfect condition until it is bottled and packaged
  • Please ensure that all your olive oils are PUCHASED in dark containers – Olive Oil in see through bottles DEGRADES